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Photo of a female red winged blackbird

Even though the red-winged blackbird is one of the most abundant birds in North America, the female often goes unrecognized or is even mistaken for a large sparrow.

So here she is. Isn’t she beautiful!

I took this photo with my 70-300 mm lens at 290 mm, ISO 800, f/11, 1/500 sec.

For more information, contact me at rob@robwiebe.com.

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Une photo de quelques quenouilles sèchées

La quenouille on la retrouve tant dans les fossés le long des autoroutes que dans les étendues d’eau plus vastes comme les lacs. La quenouille ne demande pour proliférer que de l’eau et du soleil; elle pousse partout sur le territoire québécois.

Les quenouilles sèchées sont jolies en printemps. On peut les utilisées dans les arrangements floraux ou pour faire tricoter un panier.

J’ai pris cette photo tôt le matin à 210 mm, 1600  ISO, F5.6, 1/3000 sec.

Pour en svaoir plus, contactez-moi à rob@robwiebe.com

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Photograph of the waterfalls at Fort Coulonge with a rainbow

Coulonge Falls

The Coulonge falls are the spectacular 48 metre high main attraction at an historic site that pays tribute to the Outaouais’ early log-driving and trading post days. In the days of the voyageur, these falls required a 1 km portage.

I took this photo with my 28-70mm lens at 35 mm, ISO 140, f/22, 1/6 sec.

For more information, contact me at rob@robwiebe.com

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Picture of the five arch stone bridge in Pakenham, Ontario

The five span stone bridge in Pakenham, Ontario, is the only stone bridge of its kind in North America. Built in 1901 to allow horses and carriages to cross the Mississippi River, it’s a real treat for the eyes.

I took this photo with my 28-70mm lens at 28 mm, ISO 100, f/11, 1/100 sec.

For more information, contact me at rob@robwiebe.com

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Macro photo of a Nursery Web spider sitting in water

The Nursery Web spider is a powerful hunting spider that comes in a variety of colours. It lives at the edges of forests and old fields.

These spiders don’t spin a snare to catch food. Rather, they wait motionless in ambush and overpower unsuspecting insects as they pass by.

There are more than 600 species of spiders in Quebec.

I took this photo with my 60mm macro lens at 60 mm, ISO 100, f/10, 1/125 sec.

For more information contact me at rob@robwiebe.com

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Photo d'un Harfang des neiges

Harfang des neiges

Le Harfang des neiges est un hibou majestueux qui est très reconnaissable. Il est l’emblème aviaire de Québec depuis 1987.

Grace à une irruption hivernale cette année le Harfang des neiges est facile à repérer dans la région de la Capitale nationale.

J’ai pris cette photo dans l’éclairage du matin à 550 mm, 500  ISO, F8, 1/1250.

Pour en svaoir plus, contactez-moi à rob@robwiebe.com

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Photo of a turkey vulture with its wings open

Turkey vulture

Some people will say that Turkey vultures turn their backs to the sun and spread their wings to kill the bacteria that coats their wings after eating dead meat. Others will say Turkey vultures do this to warm themselves on cold mornings. Whatever the reason, it sure makes for good photography!

I got this got shot at 600 mm, F5.6, 1/250 sec, ISO 100.

For more information contact me at rob@robwiebe.com

 

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Photo d'un huard dans son nid

Hier, j’ai eu l’occasion de me rapprocher de ce bel oiseau irisé pour prendre quelques photos de celui-ci dans son environnement naturel. Merci beaucoup madame le huard!

Le huard est un plongeur exceptionnel. Il se nourrit principalement de poissons. Le plainte du huard est envoûtant et facilement reconnaissable.

J’ai pris cette photo dans l’éclairage naturel avec mon objectif à focale variable à 380 mm,  500  ISO, F10, 1/100 seconde.

Pour en svaoir plus, contactez-moi à rob@robwiebe.com

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Photo of a great horned owl

Great horned owl

Robert Capa said, “If your photos aren’t good enough, then you’re not close enough.”

I agree.

I captured this young owl at 400 mm, F5.6, 1/1000 sec, ISO 1600. I managed to get within a few metres of it to take the shot.

For more information, contact me at rob@robwiebe.com

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Macro photo of a yellow trout lily

Now that spring has sprung, it’s amazing how quickly life comes to the forest floor.

Consider the yellow trout lily. This delightful ephemeral flower appears as soon as the weather gets warm and disappears when it gets hot. In that time, the trout lily will leaf out, bloom, proliferate a bit and go to seed. All that work within just a few weeks. How delightfully efficient.

I took this photo with my 105 macro lens at 100 mm, ISO 100, f/13, 1/5 sec.

For more information contact me at rob@robwiebe.com

 

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Photo of a male wood duck

The wood duck – flamboyance, elegance and hard work

What a flamboyant bird! The male “woodie” comes with over 6 different colours – red, metallic purplish-green, white stripes, patches of yellow, dark red, black and blue. The hen is less conspicuous. She has some beautiful brown and white flecked feathers with blue under her wings and a distinctive teardrop-shaped white eye patch and a whitish […]

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Photo of Chloée ziplining through the jungle canopy in Roatan, Honduras

Ziplining through the jungle in Honduras

Ever wonder what it would be like to go zipping through the jungle canopy, high above the ground, hanging by a thread? I did and so did the girls. So we tried it while we were in Honduras and I have to say, it really was a fabulous experience.     During our stay on […]

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Photo of a turkey vulture

The turkey vulture culture

While not one of the prettiest creatures in Honduras, the turkey vulture makes up for what it lacks in the beauty department by being incredibly useful to mother earth. Turkey vultures are large, meat-eating birds that excel at soaring. They don’t kill to survive; they survive on things that have been killed. Turkey vultures are […]

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Photo of two dolphins jumping

Atlantic bottlenose dolphin in Honduras

Bottlenose dolphins are one of the best known dolphins. They live in warm salt water oceans around the world. They’re sleek, highly trainable, highly intelligent creatures that stay together in close knit social groups called “pods” and have a complex communication system, including sounds for individual names or “signature whistles.” I heard that the best place to […]

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Photo of a blue-tailed emerald hummingbird having a snak

Honduras hummers

On the mosquito coast, the skeeters are bigger than the hummingbirds but the hummers outnumber the skeeters, which is good news for mosquito bait gringos like me. The blue-tailed emerald hummingbird (Esmeralda de Cola Azul in Spanish) averages 7.4 cm in length and weighs around 2.6 g. They are abundant here. The male’s plumage is […]

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Photo of a male junco

Show me your junco

Today I saw some juncos; it’s not the first time, for sure, but I had my camera so I was able to snap a few shots to show you just how gorgeous these little birds are. The snowbird The dark-eyed junco or “snowbird” is a common winter visitor to many Canadian backyards. It’s called the snowbird […]

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Photo of Chloée doing a grand jeté during her ballet solo

Danse dance danse

Yesterday was the avant première for Chloée’s dance troupe. It was at the Museum of Civilization in Hull.  It went really well. Over 100 dance numbers were perfomed in a span of about 7 hours.  Chloée had 5 numbers in jazz and ballet to perform throughout the day – 4 group numbers and one solo. […]

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